bushcricket

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New insect species mimics dead leaves for camouflage

A new species of bushcricket which mimics dead leaves to the point of near invisibility and sings so loud humans can hear it has been examined for the first time using advanced technologies to reveal the unusual acoustic properties of its wings. Zoology student Andrew Baker, from Market Harborough,...

Hearing capabilities of bushcrickets and mammals

A new review paper detailing the functional mechanics of katydid (bushcricket) hearing has been published in an international journal. Dr Fernando Montealegre-Z, from the School of Life Sciences, University of Lincoln, UK, together with Professor Daniel Robert from the University of Bristol, aim to present in detail the functional...

BBC One documentary features academic’s research

​Research into the hearing abilities of bushcrickets by the School of Life Sciences Dr Fernando Montealegre-Z has been featured by the BBC. Brought forward from its original transmission date, Super Senses: The Secret Power of Animals was screened by BBC One at 8pm on Tuesday, 26th August. The series...

Research showcased at Royal Society national science exhibition

Two pioneering research projects involving scientists from the School of Life Sciences are featured in a major public exhibition by The Royal Society. The Royal Society’s prestigious Summer Science Exhibition, which runs from 1st July to 6th July, 2014, is the organisation’s premier public engagement event of the year,...

Past and present will wow public at air show

Visitors to this year’s RAF Waddington International Air Show can meet a 3D-printed robot and listen to the sound of an insect that lived 165 million years ago. A new exhibit this year is the ‘Jurassic Acoustic Detective’ , which will explain the story of how the fossil record...