Dr Carl Soulsbury

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Dr Soulsbury’s research featured at NHM symposium

On the 11th and 12th of November 2017 London’s Natural History Museum hosted HumaNature, a co-sponsored conference between World Extreme Medicine (WEM), the Society for Experimental Biology, brought together experts in the fields of medicine and animal physiology. Our School’s Senior Lecturer, Dr Carl Soulsbury, delivered a talk about...

Wildlife in built-up areas: undervalued in our urban ecosystems

Urban wildlife such as deer, foxes and badgers should be cherished for the ecological benefits they bring to towns and cities, rather than feared as potentially harmful pests, scientists argue in a new report. The review, published in the scientific journal Wildlife Research, states that in order for humans...

Drivers of sexual traits: age and a whole lot more

Many male animals have multiple displays and behaviours to attract females; and often the larger or greater the better. Understanding what has driven the evolution of these traits is an important evolutionary question. A new study spearheaded by Matti Kervinen at the University of Jyvaskyla, Finland, working with Carl...

New research suggest red foxes are two species

Dr Carl Soulsbury, from the School of Life Sciences, was part of a team whose research sheds new light on the origin of red foxes. Red foxes are the most widely distributed living land carnivore, being found across the northern hemisphere and with an introduced range including Australia. They...