life sciences

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Beetles are equal partners in mating behaviour

New research conducted by Entomologists at the University of Lincoln’s School of Life Sciences has discovered the mating habits of beetles. The research concluded that beetles that copulate with the same mate as opposed to different partners will repeat the same behaviour. This debunks previous suggestions that one sex exerts...

A tortoise (almost) never forgets!

Research undertaken by the School of Life Sciences shows that the red-footed tortoise is able remember the location of their favourite food sources along with the biggest stashes of food for at least 18 months! These findings were published this month in the Royal Society journal, Biology Letters.  When animals are making...

New research sheds light on why plants change sex

Plants with a particular breeding system change their sex depending on how much light they receive, new scientific research has revealed. The ability of plants to flower one year as male and the next as female, or vice versa, is well documented in ‘dioecious’ plants, however the causes of...

Students visit Animal Inside Out exhibition in Newcastle

University of Lincoln Life Sciences students see the world’s most amazing creatures like they’d never seen them before. The Animal Inside Out: A Body Worlds Production is an unforgettable exhibit featuring real-life animals from gorillas to giraffes, elephants to dogs, all preserved through plastination. This is a process used in anatomy...